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  • Natasha Gaiski, Editor/Proofreader

What's The Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?


What’s the Difference between Editing and Proofreading?

You just wrote your first short story. It’s a story based on plot twists, an intriguing character, and a complex storyline. You took the time to carefully put down every word on paper.

Now you are looking to publish this story — what do you do now? It’s time to decide if you want to have an editor go carefully over your story or simply look through it for any noticeable errors. The names of these two processes, respectively, are proofreading and editing. While they may sound the same, there are marked differences in the author-editor relationship, the work itself, and the end results.

Editing: Intense Work, Excellent Results

Editing is the more involved of the two processes. Editing may bring to mind horror-filled images of pages drenched in red ink, but that is not editing. Editing is a close author-editor relationship where the editor respects the author’s own particular writing style while making suggestions for clarity and tone. The editor also checks for spelling and grammatical errors, correcting them or pointing them out if necessary. An editor guides the author in the quest for a more polished piece that is ready for publication.

Back to your short story. If you want someone who can check the flow of your short story and look for any spelling errors as well as more suggestions on the piece itself, editing would be your best bet. The staff at Jacobs Writing Consultants takes the relationship between editors and authors seriously and will guide you through the entire process. If you are simply looking for a trained eye to catch any other errors, proofreading would be the best choice.

Proofreading: A Second Glance before Publication

Proofreading involves a more hands-off approach on the part of the editor. The editor will take the piece and read through it and correct any obvious spelling and grammar errors. Proofreading is primarily used as the last read through before the document goes to print. It is meant as a double check, since the editor may not be the same person as the proofreader. Proofreading erases the chance of an extra word in a sentence, a commonly misspelled word the editor may have overlooked, and other possibilities.

We Can Help!

No matter what process you choose, we know how to guide you through the process of checking your document for any additional errors. Let us help you share your story with the world!


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